Home · About · Articles · Find · Hotels · Maps · Link to us · Contact
Read First
Traveldir.org features a collection of Michigan travel, vacation and hotels related articles. Please feel free to submit your travel guide, personal travelogue, Michigan hotel guide or any other travel related story.
Browse Articles


Latest Articles
RSS
Search Articles
Hotel Reservation
To reserve hotel rooms on discount rates online be sure to check the hotels these fine hotel booking sites offer.

Destination:     select from list
 
Arrival:
Set your arrival date!
Departure:
Set your departure date!
Room type:
Currency Exchange
into
Measurement Conversion
=
Bookmark using any bookmark manager!
You are here:
Home > North America > United States > Articles
Articles > North America > United States > Michigan > Lake Huron Fishing

You are not logged in: Login · Register · Submit Article

This article: PDF version PDF version · printable version printer friendly version

See also: Michigan Travel Articles

Click here to bookmark this site: Bookmark Hotels & Travel Guide
Lake Huron Fishing
There are lakes you can fish on and then there is Lake Huron. Lake Huron fishing is some of the best in both the states and the world.

Here are some facts on Lake Huron. It is the 2nd largest of the Great Lakes of North America. This makes it the 3rd largest fresh water lake in the world. It spans 23,010 square miles, which makes it about the size of West Virginia. There are 3,827 miles of shoreline. The length of the lake is 206 miles and it is 183 miles wide. The average depth is 195 feet and the maximum depth is 750 feet. Like the other Great Lakes, melting glacial ice formed it.

Now, that is all very interesting, but the real question that occurs to most of us when we think about a really big lake is does it have really big fish? The answer is a resounding yes. Lake Huron Fishing is thriving again, but it has been a long hard environmental fight. When the first European explorers first wandered to its shores and named it after the local Indians, the lake was clean and teeming with native species of fish. As civilization spread along its shores, so did pollution.

The history of Lake Huron as a fishery has been a horror story of the effects of pollution and the mismanagement of our natural resources. It has also been an encouraging tale of what can be accomplished when sportsmen and environmentalists work together to restore and improve conditions. Today, Lake Huron is home not only to reviving natural species, but also many imported species as well. The Chinook salmon that is famous for its heroic journey up the rivers of the Northwest to their spawning grounds is one example.

There has been an active stocking program in Lake Huron for several years now. Chinook salmon are released into the lake after been raised in hatcheries. The fish thrives in the lake although they have not been able to reproduce as they have not been able to adapt their genetic spawning urge to Michigan and Canadian rivers. They still live for an average of over five years and grow to full adult size in the Lake.

Charter boats are available on both the American and Canadian sides of the Lake. The boats often specialize in finding the salmon. Although this is a true fishing experience, it is only one that is possible in Lake Huron. There are also large numbers of bass, walleye, pike, and musky to be found. Lake Huron fishing has been brought back from a critical point and is rapidly returning to its glory days. It is the responsibility of our society to not only protect our natural resources for our use, but to insure that they will be there for our grandchildren also. The successful stocking and fishery management programs in Lake Huron show what can be done.
About the Author
Rick Chapo is with Nomad Journals - makers of travel journals to preserve your travel experiences.
Statistics & Ratings
Submitted by: rick.chapo
Total views: 2969
Word count: 481
Character count: 2743
Article rating: none yet
Number of votes: 0
Rate this article now:
Comments
No comments posted yet.
Please login or register to post a comment.

www.traveldir.org