Home · About · Articles · Find · Hotels · Maps · Link to us · Contact
Read First
Traveldir.org features a collection of Canada travel, vacation and hotels related articles. Please feel free to submit your travel guide, personal travelogue, Canada hotel guide or any other travel related story.
Browse Articles


Latest Articles
RSS
Search Articles
Hotel Reservation
To reserve hotel rooms on discount rates online be sure to check the hotels these fine hotel booking sites offer.

Destination:     select from list
 
Arrival:
Set your arrival date!
Departure:
Set your departure date!
Room type:
Currency Exchange
into
Measurement Conversion
=
Bookmark using any bookmark manager!
You are here:
Home > North America > Canada > Articles
Articles > North America > Canada > Bird Watching in Ontario

You are not logged in: Login · Register · Submit Article

This article: PDF version PDF version · printable version printer friendly version

See also: Canada Start Page · Canada Travel Articles

Click here to bookmark this site: Bookmark Hotels & Travel Guide
Bird Watching in Ontario
With over 473 species to search for, Ontario birding is some of the best in Canada. Whether you are looking for the province bird, the Common Loon, or another beautiful flying creature, Ontario is an ideal choice for birding.

The Common Loon is one of the key birds to look for when birding in Ontario. It is identified as the province bird of Ontario. Unfortunately, acid rain has caused conditions in lakes where loons commonly breed to become unfavorable. This has led to a decline in the number of loons throughout Ontario. Loons excel at diving. Their eyes are able to see as well in the water as they do in the air. They also have the ability to paddle up to two hundred feet below the water's surface. Their primary colors are black, white and gray.

Amherst Island is a popular destination for Ontario birding. It is an ideal spot for seeing owls during the winter months, primarily in December. For those heading out in the spring, Long Point is excellent for seeing the migration of the warblers. There is a bird observatory located there which is a good place to start if you are a beginning bird watcher.

Prince Edward County is an area that attracts many bird watchers. Over three hundred species of birds have been seen in this area alone. It attracts all types of migratory birds because of its location along Lake Ontario. It also boasts a wide variety of landscapes, which adds to the appeal for birds looking to make a temporary home. Guided tours are available throughout the area, and educational classes are given at the Prince Edward Point Bird Observatory. The Bird Observatory takes part in a bird banding program, where an aluminum ring is placed around a bird's leg. Each band is numbered, and key data about the bird is recorded. This allows scientists, both in Canada and internationally, to track the migration of birds with a high level of accuracy.

Point Pelee is another popular place for Ontario birding. It is located on Lake Erie. Known as one of the top 10 birding locations in North America, it is host to large groups of migrating birds in the spring and fall. Warblers and blue jays are seen in massive amounts, and it is even an ideal place to spot monarch butterflies.

Birding in Ontario can be great fun, even for the beginner. Checklists of commonly spotted birds in the area are available at many locations. Although Ontario has some great spots to search for birds, you can participate in birding anywhere in Ontario. Simply grab a field guide and a pair of binoculars and get started. Once you are ready to learn more, join up with one of the many guided tours or bird watching groups located throughout Ontario.
About the Author
Rick Chapo is with Nomad Journals - makers of travel journals to preserve your travel experiences.
Statistics & Ratings
Submitted by: rick.chapo
Total views: 4055
Word count: 464
Character count: 2718
Article rating: none yet
Number of votes: 0
Rate this article now:
Comments
No comments posted yet.
Please login or register to post a comment.

www.traveldir.org